Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

KINGSTON WELL​BEING

SOME RECENT ABSTRACTS FROM OUR PRESENTATIONS/WORKSHOPS

Please contact us if you would like to know more about any of these themes. You can also read about them further in our forthcoming book, to be published in 2021. Details will follow soon.

Colombo 2020

1 Radicalisation, Globalisation and Stigma 

Dr N Yoganathan

Since humans moved from being hunter gathers to living in settled groups, social harmony relied on creating hierarchies and rituals, which gradually became normalised and representative of the group’s identity. These were necessary to manage conflicts between created by conflicting individual and group needs. Over time, beliefs became ossified, producing a sense of security through cultural and social identities. Sadly, conscious and unconscious needs and greed, result in the desire for control and domination. These are the beginnings of fundamentalism and radicalisation and reflect how destructive group processes, envy, splitting and projection, are acted out in medium to large group contexts.

By the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution and emergence of the middle classes were extending boundaries; movement of people offered opportunities for cultural mixing. This was beneficial for many, but brought stigmatisation e.g. racism, classism etc., for others, through those same group processes. Following two world wars and the uneasy balance of cold war powers, 20th century national group identities held but, by the end of that century, were beginning to fracture.

This first presentation examines forms of stigma in the context of identity and culture, before relating this to radicalisation of the individual and/or group. The second presentation looks at the history of groups and both their therapeutic and destructive powers.

Today’s globalised world, the result of the market economy and communication, has led to mass migrations within a short period, due to socio-political and financial conflicts as well as natural disasters. Whilst relocation is an opportunity for many in terms of education, employment and personal enrichment, it inevitably adulterates social/cultural identities. If managed in a health way, the resulting emotional responses (e.g. anxiety and bereavement) will lead to integration and harmony. But if managed badly, they will result in regressive and primitive responses and destructive group processes e.g. dependency, pairing, fight-flight, as described by Bion. These group phenomena are the fundamental drives behind previous and current extremist ideologies and terrorism.

As these are medium to large group phenomena, they can only be successfully addressed by using alternative group processes based on dialogue e.g. Median Groups, pioneered by Pat de Mare and others. For the dialogue to be healthy, we must understand how each of these processes affects us individually and the groups we identify with. To be effective, any programmes designed to deal with radicalisation must do so at the personal, small group and large group levels.

This presentation examines group processes and some examples of destructive groups in recent times. It returns to the cycle of stigmatisation in order to consider means of confronting and dealing with radicalisation.

2 Stigma, madness and mindfulness 

Dr N Yoganathan

The WHO‘s definition of health as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" is understandable in its context of post-war, 1948, idealism. But is it fit for the vastly different 21st century world of globalisation yet division?

In the UK, the rapid movement of care of the mentally ill from health/social institutions into the community has been controversial. It was based on well-meaning but ill-thought through ideologies and has resulted in a significant reduction of health service generic hospital beds, and an exponential increase in ‘forensic’ beds in the public and private sectors, as well as in penal institutions: over the last 25 years, the prison population has doubled, disproportionate to demographic growth. This is the madness of psychiatry and has added further to stigmatisation of the mentally ill.

This presentation explores the definition and process of stigmatisation. It shows how pejorative language add to stigmatisation, then returns to the WHO definition of health.

In the past, medicine (including psychiatry) was practised in a paternalistic way: from a perceived imbalance in the brain’s humidity (Hippocrates) or of the humours (Galen); through religious or evil possession; to the socio-dynamics of the asylums; psycho-dynamics (structure of the mind); neuro-psycho-pharmacological and cognitive/behavioural science (function of the mind).

21st century Western psychiatry has seen the incorporation of complex Eastern philosophical ideas, which are inherently incongruent, resulting in DBT and mindfulness practices. These may meet the demands of short-term, quasi-measurable outcomes but are likely to be mindless in the long term. Components of the body can be defined, measured and normatively compared, but the ‘mind’ of an individual is not confined to the brain alone: broader contexts of ‘family’ and ‘community’ are involved. Hence, despite scientific advances, and centuries of philosophical/religious debate, ‘the mind’ remains elusive.

This second presentation compares psychiatry from didactic and dialectic perspectives. An alternative model of the mind is proposed before addressing stigmatisation and mental illness. Various methods of dealing with mental illness are considered, including mindfulness training.

In the 21st century, the bio-psycho-social model and less paternalistic approaches to psychiatry were meant to provide a more integrated, egalitarian service and reduce stigma, but have largely failed in the UK. This is because evidence-based practice is appropriate for aspects of medicine that can be unambiguously measured. Its blind application in the field of psychiatry though, has resulted in robotic processes such as short-term targets and guidelines, splitting, dehumanised and increasingly mindlessness practice. Ironically, this is nothing less than another form of paternalism. In the UK, many patients with complex mental health needs find themselves confined to penal and forensic institutions.

It is not surprising that CBT (an effective though robotic treatment for less complex conditions), is now being adulterated through the superficial incorporation of very complex Eastern philosophical concepts such as Zen and mindfulness so as to become more humane. Is this ‘old wine in new bottles’ or Kentucky-fried Buddhism?

In order to address these contexts and controversies, we must revisit some of the principles of the past, e.g. Socrates’ questioning, Plato’s pursuit of supreme knowledge through dialogue, the antinomies of Kant, to the Hegelian triad of thesis/ antithesis/ synthesis.

Darwin’s model of adaptation is achieved over several generations, but for a healthy mind, adaptation must be achieved within a single lifetime.

The final part of this symposium presents some examples of Eastern philosophy and art. In conclusion, we propose that the WHO’s definition of health as "a state of optimal physical, mental, and social well-being." Only then, can we be truly mindful of long-term, more humane outcomes. 

3 Creativity, drugs, madness and recovery 

Dr N Yoganathan

The concept of health is intertwined with ‘wellbeing’ in the physical, mental and social contexts, as defined by the WHO in 1948, yet it is only in recent decades that we have focused on the role of wellbeing. As a social construct based on perceived values, the notion of wellbeing differs between individuals and cultures; nevertheless, there is a growing acceptance that ‘wellbeing’ is a more realistic goal than that of ‘complete health’ envisaged in the WHO definition.

Creativity is fundamental for both wellbeing and recovery, but, like wellbeing, perceptions are diverse. In order to improve understanding of the relationship between creativity and wellbeing, we examine some leading models of creativity at personal and social levels, including Kaufman and Beghetto’s (2009) Four Cs Model. We then locate creativity within an international framework for wellbeing.

This leads to consideration of the importance of creativity as a contributor to personal and social wellbeing in the 21st century, as longevity increases, populations rise, and once fixed values are changed by globalisation and migration. Pressures on finite resources demand that we take personal and collective responsibility for optimising our wellbeing. Recognition of the significant role that creativity plays is essential to this process.

2019 sees the 50th anniversary of the infamous Woodstock Festival, where music, drugs and counter-culture gained popular status. This was an inevitable response to social and political events of the time in the USA, where stress was relieved and expressed through music and mind-altering drugs. 50 years on, the world is faced with different demands, particularly a disproportionate call on mental health services and prescription of medications. This is further complicated by social media, mass migration, ecological dangers, growing inequality and more, resulting in adulteration of values and identities and leading to radicalisation.

In this context, we look at the regulation of drugs in the UK and the ambivalent relationship between drugs, creativity and mental wellbeing. We also address the psychiatric co-morbidities and the reasons for high rates of relapse. As both a psychiatrist and a group convenor, the presenter seeks to demystify issues through a Median Group dialogue.

The presentation includes short video clips of artists performing at Woodstock Festival and the influence of drugs on their creativity.

Despite advancements in medicine, science and technology, addictions remain a problem in all cultures, especially in the West, where there is evidence of increased use among the over-50s. Drugs intended for physical and neurological conditions are also being increasingly abused and have become subject to legal regulation.

This presentation traces the origins of the term ‘recovery’ in the field of addiction. It has now found its way into the realm of psychiatry but with different meaning and expectations on the part of patients, carers, professionals and governments. The story of three band members of the original Fleetwood Mac captures the real essence of creativity, drugs, mental breakdowns and their subsequent ‘recoveries’.

The presentation includes brief video clips of Fleetwood Mac’s history and music, as a preamble to group discussion of this important, controversial topic. 

4 Human sexuality, art and ambivalence: 40 years on 

Dr N Yoganathan

Even in the 21st century, sexual matters still create a great deal of anxiety for both patients and professionals. Despite the impact of mass media and globalisation, on the one hand, ‘sex sells’ and on the other, it remains a taboo subject, due to ignorance and value judgements based on idiosyncratic beliefs rooted in religion and cultural norms. Some cultures use art, music and imagery as a means of reconciling themselves with conflict and discomfort related to sexual diversity.

Food, water, shelter and reproduction are essential for survival of the species. Reproduction in the plant and animal worlds is affected by climatic and other natural changes, but is free of the stigma and taboo experienced by humans. Whilst we have come a long way in overcoming the stigma once associated with some physical illnesses and disabilities, we still struggle with the stigma associated with psychological conditions, including matters relating to sex. The symposium aims to demystify and destigmatise human sexuality.

In the first part of the symposium we hear a short version of a humorous calypso that captures the essence of human curiosity and sexual taboo. Then we consider some recent examples from UK media which reflect our ambivalence, and examine how pejorative language is used to deflect our discomfort. We explore the process of stigmatisation and a model for overcoming it before viewing some works of art from different cultures.

Sexual ‘problems’ can be both a cause and an effect of psychiatric disorders, and of some medical conditions. Furthermore, some psycho-tropic and other medications can also result in sexual problems for both men and women. The discomfort for both doctor and patient in discussing such conditions may lead to difficulty in finding the right language to use.

The presentation begins with defining gender and sexuality. It then focuses on the work of some pioneers of human sexuality from the 19th century to the late 20th e.g. Kinsey, Masters & Johnson, Hite. It traces theoretical perspectives through history, before considering normality, dysfunction and deviation, as defined by ICD-10, the management and treatment of psychiatric disorders related to sexuality.

Artefacts from different cultures are used to illustrate the diversity of human sexuality. The session concludes by returning to the calypso introduced in the first part of this symposium and hearing the full version.

This part of the symposium offers an opportunity for participants to share their experience of sexuality and gender matters in the context of their own culture and profession and to expand their understanding of current treatments available.

Like most mental illnesses, those related to sexuality are strongly influenced by the social context – small and large groups. Despite the relative freedom of expression of sexuality in many cultures, there is still considerable personal stigma and taboo, which often remains covert. Although human sexuality is a private and personal matter, stigma experienced by the individual is a group phenomenon. It can be addressed most effectively using a healthy group forum.

The session is led by an experienced group convenor, and will follow Median Groups principles. The Median Group, pioneered by the late Pat de Maré, offers a forum for ‘impersonal fellowship’. Through confronting idiosyncratic views, we can address stigma and splitting, thereby promoting healthier dialogue with each other and within ourselves, essential to effective resolution of current conflicts and controversies, from the personal to the global level.

“To be truly mindful of others, we have to reach a state of ‘no mind.’”

Dr N Yoganathan, 2009 World Federation for Mental Health, Hong Kong

5 Eastern spirituality, mental health and wellbeing 

Dr N Yoganathan

The importance of personal wellbeing has become ever greater as the world population soars (from a current 7.6 billion to10 billion by the year 2056) and longevity rises (the average life expectancy is presently 79.09 years for males and 82.82 for females). Whilst we welcome having additional years of life, how do we ensure they are healthy and meaningful? How do we sustain our quality of life when there are ever-increasing demands on state and global resources?

Migration and cultural transition enrich societies but can threaten personal and group identities. Religious beliefs and practices, traditionally central to identity, are becoming eroded and polarised. In the UK, psychiatry and religion, once closely connected through the care of the mentally ill, have gradually moved apart since religion became associated with hysteria and neurosis in the late 19th century.

Today, formal religion appears to play little part in many communities, but what of spirituality? While recognising their differences, religion and spirituality have a significant role in our sense of wellbeing. As a prelude to the second presentation, which is focused on Eastern spirituality, this first presentation considers some generic aspects of religion, spirituality and wellbeing, and is illustrated by extracts from the presenter’s qualitative research of 2016(1).

As medicine advances through science and technology, psychiatry is increasingly caught up in evidence-based practices. This results in didactic models, which are appropriate for pharmacological and other physical interventions but are, by definition, dichotomous. Didactic models are likely to run into difficulties when it comes to psycho-therapeutic interventions since, unlike the body and brain, which are confined to the individual, the ‘normality’ of the mind is determined by interactions between the individual, small group (family/society) and large group (country/world).

Although we associate the beginnings of Western psychotherapy with Freud, his ideas were influenced by predecessors such as Mesmer and Charcot. Freudian concepts explained mostly ‘neurotic’ symptoms; it was Jungian ideas, influenced by Eastern mysticism, that enabled us to understand and therapeutically manage more profound human, ‘psychotic’, experiences. In the late 20th century, such dynamic interventions were displaced by shorter, evidence-based therapies such as CBT, due to financial and other sociological constraints.

Similarly, in the 21st century, Eastern mystical concepts based on Zen are once more being adopted for the management of patients with more complex needs, e.g. through mindfulness-based CBT and DBT. These are based on manuals and are delivered in a prescriptive way. Mindfulness is the latest fad; it is now commodified, packaged and delivered, hence I call it Kentucky-fried Buddhism.

This workshop uses short video clips and Zen koans to capture the true essence of mindfulness, which is sometimes simple but also very profound.

(1) Willis, J. Persaud, A. Bhugra, D. (2016) The centre for Allied Research and Education International Foundation/World Psychiatric Association. Global Survey of Wellbeing. Report of Findings. www.careif.org and House of Lords Library. London. UK. (Careif/WPA Wellbeing.2016)

BUCHAREST 2019

Stigma, Globalisation & Radicalisation 

1 Stigma, cultural/social identity and globalisation

Dr Jenny Willis

Since humans moved from being hunter gathers to living in settled groups, social harmony relied on creating hierarchies and rituals, which gradually became normalised and representative of the group’s identity. These were necessary to manage conflicts between created by conflicting individual and group needs. Over time, beliefs became ossified, producing a sense of security through cultural and social identities. Sadly, conscious and unconscious needs and greed, result in the desire for control and domination. These are the beginnings of fundamentalism and radicalisation and reflect how destructive group processes, envy, splitting and projection, are acted out in medium to large group contexts.

By the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution and emergence of the middle classes were extending boundaries; movement of people offered opportunities for cultural mixing. This was beneficial for many, but brought stigmatisation e.g. racism, classism etc., for others, through those same group processes. Following two world wars and the uneasy balance of cold war powers, 20th century national group identities held but, by the end of that century, were beginning to fracture.

This first presentation examines forms of stigma in the context of identity and culture, before relating this to radicalisation of the individual and/or group. The second presentation looks at the history of groups and both their therapeutic and destructive powers.


2 History of groups and radicalisation

Dr N Yoganathan

Today’s globalised world, the result of the market economy and communication, has led to mass migrations within a short period, due to socio-political and financial conflicts as well as natural disasters. Whilst relocation is an opportunity for many in terms of education, employment and personal enrichment, it inevitably adulterates social/cultural identities. If managed in a health way, the resulting emotional responses (e.g. anxiety and bereavement) will lead to integration and harmony. But if managed badly, they will result in regressive and primitive responses and destructive group processes e.g. dependency, pairing, fight-flight, as described by Bion. These group phenomena are the fundamental drives behind previous and current extremist ideologies and terrorism.

As these are medium to large group phenomena, they can only be successfully addressed by using alternative group processes based on dialogue e.g. Median Groups, pioneered by Pat de Mare and others. For the dialogue to be healthy, we must understand how each of these processes affects us individually and the groups we identify with. To be effective, any programmes designed to deal with radicalisation must do so at the personal, small group and large group levels.

This presentation examines group processes and some examples of destructive groups in recent times. It returns to the cycle of stigmatisation in order to consider means of confronting and dealing with radicalisation.

Stigma, madness and mindfulness 

1 Stigma, the madness of psychiatry and a redefinition of health

Dr Jenny Willis

The WHO‘s definition of health as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" is understandable in its context of post-war, 1948, idealism. But is it fit for the vastly different 21st century world of globalisation yet division?

In the UK, the rapid movement of care of the mentally ill from health/social institutions into the community has been controversial. It was based on well-meaning but ill-thought through ideologies and has resulted in a significant reduction of health service generic hospital beds, and an exponential increase in ‘forensic’ beds in the public and private sectors, as well as in penal institutions: over the last 25 years, the prison population has doubled, disproportionate to demographic growth. This is the madness of psychiatry and has added further to stigmatisation of the mentally ill.

This presentation explores the definition and process of stigmatisation. It shows how pejorative language add to stigmatisation, then returns to the WHO definition of health.


2 Madness and mindfulness

Dr N Yoganathan

In the past, medicine (including psychiatry) was practised in a paternalistic way: from a perceived imbalance in the brain’s humidity (Hippocrates) or of the humours (Galen); through religious or evil possession; to the socio-dynamics of the asylums; psycho-dynamics (structure of the mind); neuro-psycho-pharmacological and cognitive/behavioural science (function of the mind).

21st century Western psychiatry has seen the incorporation of complex Eastern philosophical ideas, which are inherently incongruent, resulting in DBT and mindfulness practices. These may meet the demands of short-term, quasi-measurable outcomes but are likely to be mindless in the long term. Components of the body can be defined, measured and normatively compared, but the ‘mind’ of an individual is not confined to the brain alone: broader contexts of ‘family’ and ‘community’ are involved. Hence, despite scientific advances, and centuries of philosophical/religious debate, ‘the mind’ remains elusive.

This second presentation compares psychiatry from didactic and dialectic perspectives. An alternative model of the mind is proposed before addressing stigmatisation and mental illness. Various methods of dealing with mental illness are considered, including mindfulness training.


3 Zen, madness and mindfulness

Dr N Yoganathan

In the 21st century, the bio-psycho-social model and less paternalistic approaches to psychiatry were meant to provide a more integrated, egalitarian service and reduce stigma, but have largely failed in the UK. This is because evidence-based practice is appropriate for aspects of medicine that can be unambiguously measured. Its blind application in the field of psychiatry though, has resulted in robotic processes such as short-term targets and guidelines, splitting, dehumanised and increasingly mindlessness practice. Ironically, this is nothing less than another form of paternalism. In the UK, many patients with complex mental health needs find themselves confined to penal and forensic institutions.

It is not surprising that CBT (an effective though robotic treatment for less complex conditions), is now being adulterated through the superficial incorporation of very complex Eastern philosophical concepts such as Zen and mindfulness so as to become more humane. Is this ‘old wine in new bottles’ or Kentucky-fried Buddhism?

In order to address these contexts and controversies, we must revisit some of the principles of the past, e.g. Socrates’ questioning, Plato’s pursuit of supreme knowledge through dialogue, the antinomies of Kant, to the Hegelian triad of thesis/ antithesis/ synthesis.

Darwin’s model of adaptation is achieved over several generations, but for a healthy mind, adaptation must be achieved within a single lifetime.

The final part of this symposium presents some examples of Eastern philosophy and art. In conclusion, we propose that the WHO’s definition of health as "a state of optimal physical, mental, and social well-being." Only then, can we be truly mindful of long-term, more humane outcomes. 

Creativity, drugs, madness and recovery 

1 Creativity and mental wellbeing

Dr Jenny Willis

The concept of health is intertwined with ‘wellbeing’ in the physical, mental and social contexts, as defined by the WHO in 1948, yet it is only in recent decades that we have focused on the role of wellbeing. As a social construct based on perceived values, the notion of wellbeing differs between individuals and cultures; nevertheless, there is a growing acceptance that ‘wellbeing’ is a more realistic goal than that of ‘complete health’ envisaged in the WHO definition.

Creativity is fundamental for both wellbeing and recovery, but, like wellbeing, perceptions are diverse. In order to improve understanding of the relationship between creativity and wellbeing, we examine some leading models of creativity at personal and social levels, including Kaufman and Beghetto’s (2009) Four Cs Model. We then locate creativity within an international framework for wellbeing.

This leads to consideration of the importance of creativity as a contributor to personal and social wellbeing in the 21st century, as longevity increases, populations rise, and once fixed values are changed by globalisation and migration. Pressures on finite resources demand that we take personal and collective responsibility for optimising our wellbeing. Recognition of the significant role that creativity plays is essential to this process.


2 Drugs, creativity and Woodstock 50 years on

Dr N Yoganathan

2019 sees the 50th anniversary of the infamous Woodstock Festival, where music, drugs and counter-culture gained popular status. This was an inevitable response to social and political events of the time in the USA, where stress was relieved and expressed through music and mind-altering drugs. 50 years on, the world is faced with different demands, particularly a disproportionate call on mental health services and prescription of medications. This is further complicated by social media, mass migration, ecological dangers, growing inequality and more, resulting in adulteration of values and identities and leading to radicalisation.

In this context, we look at the regulation of drugs in the UK and the ambivalent relationship between drugs, creativity and mental wellbeing. We also address the psychiatric co-morbidities and the reasons for high rates of relapse. As both a psychiatrist and a group convenor, the presenter seeks to demystify issues through a Median Group dialogue.

The presentation includes short video clips of artists performing at Woodstock Festival and the influence of drugs on their creativity.


3 Recovery model and the story of Fleetwood Mac (1967-1972)

Dr N Yoganathan

Despite advancements in medicine, science and technology, addictions remain a problem in all cultures, especially in the West, where there is evidence of increased use among the over-50s. Drugs intended for physical and neurological conditions are also being increasingly abused and have become subject to legal regulation.

This presentation traces the origins of the term ‘recovery’ in the field of addiction. It has now found its way into the realm of psychiatry but with different meaning and expectations on the part of patients, carers, professionals and governments. The story of three band members of the original Fleetwood Mac captures the real essence of creativity, drugs, mental breakdowns and their subsequent ‘recoveries’.

The presentation includes brief video clips of Fleetwood Mac’s history and music, as a preamble to group discussion of this important, controversial topic. 

Human sexuality, art and ambivalence Bucharest 2019

1 Sexuality, stigma and language

Dr Jenny Willis

Even in the 21st century, sexual matters still create a great deal of anxiety for both patients and professionals. Despite the impact of mass media and globalisation, on the one hand, ‘sex sells’ and on the other, it remains a taboo subject, due to ignorance and value judgements based on idiosyncratic beliefs rooted in religion and cultural norms. Some cultures use art, music and imagery as a means of reconciling themselves with conflict and discomfort related to sexual diversity.

Food, water, shelter and reproduction are essential for survival of the species. Reproduction in the plant and animal worlds is affected by climatic and other natural changes, but is free of the stigma and taboo experienced by humans. Whilst we have come a long way in overcoming the stigma once associated with some physical illnesses and disabilities, we still struggle with the stigma associated with psychological conditions, including matters relating to sex. The symposium aims to demystify and destigmatise human sexuality.

In the first part of the symposium we hear a short version of a humorous calypso that captures the essence of human curiosity and sexual taboo. Then we consider some recent examples from UK media which reflect our ambivalence, and examine how pejorative language is used to deflect our discomfort. We explore the process of stigmatisation and a model for overcoming it before viewing some works of art from different cultures.


2 Sexuality, gender, culture and psychiatry

Dr N Yoganathan

Sexual ‘problems’ can be both a cause and an effect of psychiatric disorders, and of some medical conditions. Furthermore, some psycho-tropic and other medications can also result in sexual problems for both men and women. The discomfort for both doctor and patient in discussing such conditions may lead to difficulty in finding the right language to use.

The presentation begins with defining gender and sexuality. It then focuses on the work of some pioneers of human sexuality from the 19th century to the late 20th e.g. Kinsey, Masters & Johnson, Hite. It traces theoretical perspectives through history, before considering normality, dysfunction and deviation, as defined by ICD-10, the management and treatment of psychiatric disorders related to sexuality.

Artefacts from different cultures are used to illustrate the diversity of human sexuality. The session concludes by returning to the calypso introduced in the first part of this symposium and hearing the full version.


3 Open dialogue based on Median Group principles

Chair: Dr N Yoganathan

This part of the symposium offers an opportunity for participants to share their experience of sexuality and gender matters in the context of their own culture and profession and to expand their understanding of current treatments available.

Like most mental illnesses, those related to sexuality are strongly influenced by the social context – small and large groups. Despite the relative freedom of expression of sexuality in many cultures, there is still considerable personal stigma and taboo, which often remains covert. Although human sexuality is a private and personal matter, stigma experienced by the individual is a group phenomenon. It can be addressed most effectively using a healthy group forum.

The session is led by an experienced group convenor, and will follow Median Groups principles. The Median Group, pioneered by the late Pat de Maré, offers a forum for ‘impersonal fellowship’. Through confronting idiosyncratic views, we can address stigma and splitting, thereby promoting healthier dialogue with each other and within ourselves, essential to effective resolution of current conflicts and controversies, from the personal to the global level.

“To be truly mindful of others, we have to reach a state of ‘no mind.’”

Dr N Yoganathan, 2009 World Federation for Mental Health, Hong Kong

0